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Cariad

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Bristol Channel Pilot Cutter

Restoration begins

Cariad’s Restoration

Cariad’s hull, deck and rig have been restored as close as possible to her pilot cutter days; below, the accommodation is how Frank Carr illustrated it in "A Yachtsman's Log", with a few modifications. Her hull is painted black, and she bears the Cardiff pilot mark on her sails. "Cariad and Mascotte are the oldest pilot boats listed in the National Historic Ships register, so restoration work on her has always been undertaken with as much sensitivity as possible to the old lady's feelings," Ken Briggs, Cariad’s owner.

Years ashore and open to the elements took a grave toll. She had completely dried out and most of her fittings were missing. Restoration work that had been done, including deck beams, deck, dog house and skylight, needed replacing.

Restored at Portishead in 2006

Keel and Frames

In July 1997 Ken Briggs moved Cariad from Exeter Maritime Museum  which by then had closed because of financial problems to a barn near his home in the Welsh Marches, and work began on her keel and frame.


Hull and Deck

In August 1999 the boat was taken from  Mid-Wales to Bristol Deep Boatyard on the quay in Portishead, and work restarted in earnest. Three years later by June 2004 hull and deck had largely been replaced.

Fitting Out

Cariad’s hull, deck and rig have been restored as close as possible to her pilot cutter days; below, the accommodation is how Frank Carr illustrated it in "A Yachtsman's Log", with a few modifications.

Back afloat at Last

Cariad left Bristol Deep's shed on the quay in Portishead and was hoisted the few yards to the quay side in June 2006.

First Sail

The re-launch coincided with the 2006 Bristol Harbour Festival where she joined original  Bristol Channel  Pilot Cutters Mascotte, Olga and Peggy. She then sailed to Swansea where she moored alongside Olga on the Swansea Museum s’ pontoon.